Fringe That Won’t Make You Cringe

All over the fashion world, fringe is undergoing serious reputation rehab. It’s managed to shake off its heaping pile of baggage—references that range from 1920s drop-waist dresses, floral-embroidered flamenco shawls and Jimi Hendrix’s Woodstock get-up to the costumes of fringe-shaking divas Cher, Dolly Parton and Tina Turner. (These looks have their place in our world, but they’re less-than-modern and not quite appropriate for everyday—unless you’re, say, a British supermodel.)

Fringe That Won’t Make You Cringe

All over the fashion world, fringe is undergoing serious reputation rehab. It’s managed to shake off its heaping pile of baggage—references that range from 1920s drop-waist dresses, floral-embroidered flamenco shawls and Jimi Hendrix’s Woodstock get-up to the costumes of fringe-shaking divas Cher, Dolly Parton and Tina Turner. (These looks have their place in our world, but they’re less-than-modern and not quite appropriate for everyday—unless you’re, say, a British supermodel.)

From Boardroom to Hobby Vineyard

In recent years, more businesspeople and former executives have been embracing the grape life, buying European hobby vineyards and bottling their own private-label brands. Few pursue winemaking for profit; instead, many say they’re seeking an escape to nature while embracing the challenge of learning something new. The pursuit allows them to enjoy the fruits of their labor, but wild weather, hungry caterpillars and rookie mistakes can sour the experience.

Architect Michael Graves on Design Hits and Misses
Michael Graves has designed more than 350 ambitious buildings—everything from libraries and post offices to Disney resorts—but oddly enough, it’s his playful tea kettles, blenders, egg timers and other modest everyday objects that have made the 80-year-old architect, based in Princeton, N.J., a household name.
Mr. Graves discusses his most treasured possession, his favorite books, and the best piece of design advice.

Architect Michael Graves on Design Hits and Misses

Michael Graves has designed more than 350 ambitious buildings—everything from libraries and post offices to Disney resorts—but oddly enough, it’s his playful tea kettles, blenders, egg timers and other modest everyday objects that have made the 80-year-old architect, based in Princeton, N.J., a household name.

Mr. Graves discusses his most treasured possession, his favorite books, and the best piece of design advice.

Recipes That Take Tahini in New Directions

It hasn’t yet found a foothold in America’s hearts (or sandwiches) in quite the same way peanut butter has. Yet tahini, the sesame paste that is ubiquitous across the Middle East, Greece, Turkey and North Africa, is every bit as nutty, rich and irresistible—and stateside chefs are beginning to catch on.

Read on for recipes for Japanese eggplant with tahini crema, oven-roasted sea bass with green tahini and pomegranate, and milk chocolate tahini bites.

Jukebox the Ghost’s new album comes out Oct. 21 on Yep Roc Records. You can stream it exclusively here. 

Jukebox the Ghost’s new album comes out Oct. 21 on Yep Roc Records. You can stream it exclusively here

The reality is, when you’re working in that kind of an environment, betrayals and secrets are the weapons as opposed to bullets and bombs.

Michael C. Hall Gets Ready for ‘Hedwig and the Angry Inch’

Mike Potter, the hair and makeup designer for “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” has created Hedwig’s look from her humble beginning off-Broadway at the Jane Street Theater and in every incarnation up to the current Broadway production, including the movie version in between.

Michael C. Hall is the third actor to take over the role of Hedwig in this Broadway production. Having to create looks for the different actors has its challenges, Potter said.

“Neil is more masculine in the face and we needed to use tricks to feminize him, contouring his jaw and stuff like that,” he said, “whereas Andrew was very, very pretty, so he needed less.”

“Michael is sort of a perfect combination of the two, so I feel like we’re in a good place,” he said. “Michael looks very beautiful as Hedwig.”

See photos of Michael C. Hall in makeup and rehearsal.

Luxury Wine Cellars Rise Up
For centuries, wine cellars have been dark, windowless spaces with bottles stuffed into cubbies, more function than form. But that doesn’t suit a new generation, for whom wine collecting is as much a social hobby as an investment strategy.
For these collectors, the cellar needs to be a showpiece, maybe with single-paned glass, LED lights and clear sleeves that put labels on display. And befitting their elevated status, sometimes these spaces aren’t in the basement at all. “They’re not wine cellars anymore,” said Robert Bass, president of Greenville, S.C.-based Kessick Wine Cellars. “They’re wine rooms.”

Luxury Wine Cellars Rise Up

For centuries, wine cellars have been dark, windowless spaces with bottles stuffed into cubbies, more function than form. But that doesn’t suit a new generation, for whom wine collecting is as much a social hobby as an investment strategy.

For these collectors, the cellar needs to be a showpiece, maybe with single-paned glass, LED lights and clear sleeves that put labels on display. And befitting their elevated status, sometimes these spaces aren’t in the basement at all. “They’re not wine cellars anymore,” said Robert Bass, president of Greenville, S.C.-based Kessick Wine Cellars. “They’re wine rooms.”


The New Ford Mustang Proves Muscle Cars Aren’t Dead
In his latest Rumble Seat column, Dan Neil writes about muscle cars that still meet higher environmental standards:



Tighter carbon-emission standards around the world and higher fuel-economy rules in the U.S. were to mean the end of muscle cars, or at least affordable ones. But, pleasant surprise, cars have actually gotten stronger, quicker, faster. Overall, performance is cheaper, more efficient and reliable than ever. It’s the Golden Age of Horsepower, and the horses are eating diet hay.

Do you like acceleration, Johnny? Dodge will sell you a Challenger SRT Hellcat with 707 hp and an eight-speed transmission, a car that will lay down 11-second quarter-mile passes until they turn the track’s floodlights off. A roaring Mopar fever dream. Chevrolet purveys a 580-hp Camaro ZL1 with Recaro seats, six-speed manual and a clutch, offering a top speed of 184 mph. Some exotic European brands are selling “megawatt” cars, with engine outputs of more than 1,341 hp.

The New Ford Mustang Proves Muscle Cars Aren’t Dead

In his latest Rumble Seat column, Dan Neil writes about muscle cars that still meet higher environmental standards:

Tighter carbon-emission standards around the world and higher fuel-economy rules in the U.S. were to mean the end of muscle cars, or at least affordable ones. But, pleasant surprise, cars have actually gotten stronger, quicker, faster. Overall, performance is cheaper, more efficient and reliable than ever. It’s the Golden Age of Horsepower, and the horses are eating diet hay.

Do you like acceleration, Johnny? Dodge will sell you a Challenger SRT Hellcat with 707 hp and an eight-speed transmission, a car that will lay down 11-second quarter-mile passes until they turn the track’s floodlights off. A roaring Mopar fever dream. Chevrolet purveys a 580-hp Camaro ZL1 with Recaro seats, six-speed manual and a clutch, offering a top speed of 184 mph. Some exotic European brands are selling “megawatt” cars, with engine outputs of more than 1,341 hp.

Patek Philippe’s $2.6 Million Watch

The Swiss watchmaker has created an oh-so limited-edition 175th-anniversary timepiece, the Grandmaster Chime. Only seven will be produced—six for clients and one for the Patek Philippe Museum. Its price? 2.5 million Swiss francs, or $2.6 million.

Get an inside look on how the Grandmaster Chime works.