The People Who Make the Mansion Run

Thomas Sanford, a 44-year-old former cop, made a career change in 2008 and relocated a couple of years later. Now he lives on a 5-acre estate in Beverly Hills with a 10,000-square-foot French Colonial mansion and private staff.

Top estate managers range from ex-military to former fashion models, all catering to homeowners with a lot of home to handle. 

Estate managers, whose duties can include everything from patrolling the tennis court to stretching the owner’s Manolo Blahnik heels, can make upward of $200,000 a year, not including other benefits, said Bryan Peele, president of the Estate Managers Coalition in Los Angeles.

'Bridesmaids' Rose Byrne Takes Broadway
Rose Byrne is making her Broadway debut this fall in the George Kaufman and Moss Hart 1936 comedy, “You Can’t Take it With You,” starring James Earl Jones. The play, which opens Sept. 28, is about the eccentric-but-lovable Sycamore family who live in a homey mansion on the Upper West Side. Each member is encouraged to pursue his or her bizarre hobbies—snake handling, xylophone playing, ballet dancing, playwriting, and firework making, among others. Ms. Byrne plays Alice, the most conventional member of the clan, who works as a secretary and becomes engaged to her strait-laced boss’s son. When the two families meet to celebrate the engagement, their different outlooks on life make for a very uncomfortable evening. (Read more.)

'Bridesmaids' Rose Byrne Takes Broadway

Rose Byrne is making her Broadway debut this fall in the George Kaufman and Moss Hart 1936 comedy, “You Can’t Take it With You,” starring James Earl Jones. The play, which opens Sept. 28, is about the eccentric-but-lovable Sycamore family who live in a homey mansion on the Upper West Side. Each member is encouraged to pursue his or her bizarre hobbies—snake handling, xylophone playing, ballet dancing, playwriting, and firework making, among others. Ms. Byrne plays Alice, the most conventional member of the clan, who works as a secretary and becomes engaged to her strait-laced boss’s son. When the two families meet to celebrate the engagement, their different outlooks on life make for a very uncomfortable evening. (Read more.)

A Couple Retires to Ottoman Luxury

After more than 40 years of living and working in the U.S., Imran Hatiboglu and his wife, Ayse Ceylan decided to return to their native Turkey and renovate a waterfront home likely built in the 19th century. 

Little more than the shell remained of the mansion, and it was completely dilapidated. The building had been abandoned, looted and ravaged by the elements.

The Reinvention of the Entry-Level Suit


The starter suit is not what it used to be. A generation ago, a man without a great deal of means—whether he was embarking on his first job or attending his first wedding—had to settle for boxy cuts in rayon and wool-blends from departments stores. But beginning a decade ago and ramping up over the past five years, there has been a veritable revolution in men’s suiting priced under $1,000. Brands like J. Crew, Club Monaco and Suitsupply have invested in fine Italian wools, slimmer cuts and refined construction to produce moderately priced suits that offer men something similar to, and occasionally indistinguishable from, their upscale counterparts.
Plus seven stylish men—including Victor Cruz of the New York Giants and chef Daniel Boulud—talk about their first suits.

The Reinvention of the Entry-Level Suit

The starter suit is not what it used to be. A generation ago, a man without a great deal of means—whether he was embarking on his first job or attending his first wedding—had to settle for boxy cuts in rayon and wool-blends from departments stores. But beginning a decade ago and ramping up over the past five years, there has been a veritable revolution in men’s suiting priced under $1,000. Brands like J. Crew, Club Monaco and Suitsupply have invested in fine Italian wools, slimmer cuts and refined construction to produce moderately priced suits that offer men something similar to, and occasionally indistinguishable from, their upscale counterparts.

Plus seven stylish men—including Victor Cruz of the New York Giants and chef Daniel Boulud—talk about their first suits.

Renovating History in the Hamptons

The main house in Sagaponack was built in 1797 and maintains some of the original wood beams and fireplaces.

Richard Branson’s Tech Essentials

Sir Richard Branson joined The Wall Street Journal for a photoshoot on the 103rd floor of the Empire State Building.

He shared his tech essentials, including a Vitamix and BlackBerry Curve, and answered questions about what makes a great leader, and the one thing he’ll never wear.

Anthony Bourdain’s Full Plate
"Are you here to see the chef?" whispers a waiter at Sant Ambroeus restaurant in Southampton, N.Y. He’s not referring to the restaurant’s actual chef but to chef-turned-television host Anthony Bourdain, who is sitting outside on the patio. Although Mr. Bourdain now focuses his career on showcasing world cuisine rather than creating his own dishes, to the waiters and busboys eagerly refilling his coffee cup, at least, he’s still "Chef."
He earned his title: He spent nearly 30 years as a cook and a chef before writing his best-selling book “Kitchen Confidential” in 2000. That led to a series of television shows. His current show, “Parts Unknown” on CNN, which has won three Emmy Awards, provides a look at the culture and cuisine of different cities world-wide; its fourth season begins on Sept. 28. 
He still remembers his days in the kitchen well. “Most of my life I’ve been a pretty pessimistic guy, and I’ve had a pretty dark view of human nature,” he says, referring to how he used to see the world from the kitchen. It’s taken touring around the globe to turn him into a reluctant optimist. (Read more.)

Anthony Bourdain’s Full Plate

"Are you here to see the chef?" whispers a waiter at Sant Ambroeus restaurant in Southampton, N.Y. He’s not referring to the restaurant’s actual chef but to chef-turned-television host Anthony Bourdain, who is sitting outside on the patio. Although Mr. Bourdain now focuses his career on showcasing world cuisine rather than creating his own dishes, to the waiters and busboys eagerly refilling his coffee cup, at least, he’s still "Chef."

He earned his title: He spent nearly 30 years as a cook and a chef before writing his best-selling book “Kitchen Confidential” in 2000. That led to a series of television shows. His current show, “Parts Unknown” on CNN, which has won three Emmy Awards, provides a look at the culture and cuisine of different cities world-wide; its fourth season begins on Sept. 28. 

He still remembers his days in the kitchen well. “Most of my life I’ve been a pretty pessimistic guy, and I’ve had a pretty dark view of human nature,” he says, referring to how he used to see the world from the kitchen. It’s taken touring around the globe to turn him into a reluctant optimist. (Read more.)

House Hunters Go to Extreme Lengths to Land Their Dream Home

Nearly everyone has the experience of glimpsing a seemingly unattainable home and dreaming about moving in some day. But very few make those dreams a reality. When house hunters do find a way to buy their longtime dream homes, it is often a yearslong process that requires tremendous persistence, patience and a bit of luck. And as Andrew Spinney discovered, emotion often plays a powerful role in these purchases, sometimes overcoming practicality in a way that he likened to romance.

"It’s sort of like falling in love with somebody—you just are," said Mr. Spinney.

Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett: Not Such an Odd Couple
On Sept. 23, 88-year-old Tony Bennett and 28-year-old Lady Gaga will release “Cheek to Cheek” (Interscope), an album that features Mr. Bennett and Gaga singing Great American Songbook standards together and alone. The pair performed together in Israel last Saturday and will appear in a PBS “Great Performances” special on Oct. 24. Now there’s talk of an album concert tour.
Read the extended interview with Lady Gaga.
Photos: Lady Gaga Sings Duets

Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett: Not Such an Odd Couple

On Sept. 23, 88-year-old Tony Bennett and 28-year-old Lady Gaga will release “Cheek to Cheek” (Interscope), an album that features Mr. Bennett and Gaga singing Great American Songbook standards together and alone. The pair performed together in Israel last Saturday and will appear in a PBS “Great Performances” special on Oct. 24. Now there’s talk of an album concert tour.

Hillsborough, N.C.: America’s Little Literary Town

More than a dozen writers have chosen to live in Hillsborough, N.C., population 6,087, where government meetings are held in the “town barn,” and the Wooden Nickel serves up fried green tomatoes. Some seek the quiet, while others enjoy the sense of community.